XF LENS

FUJINON LENS XF18-135mmF3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR

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Max de Martino

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Photographer's Bio

Max De Martino has been photographing for 26 years.
His photos have been chosen to illustrate several magazines and books of important writers such as Wilbur Smith.
Max teaches photography for amateur and professional photographers all over Italy.
He works in Italy and abroad as a wedding and portrait photographer and collaborates with several NGOs on charity projects and documentary. As soon as he can, he catches a train or an airplane, takes his bicycle, his car or his old motorcycle BMW GS and travels: he visited 29 countries.
He is always searching for "THE" perfect photo.
And it's a great, wonderful, unreachable goal, but he never gives up.

Web site: www.maxdemartino.com

Blog: http://maxdemartinocom.wordpress.com/

About this Project

The Praglia Abbey is a beautiful place, the biggest monastic community in Italy.
Monks lives a silent, slow, peaceful life and I decided to use the 18-135 so to have only a camera and a lens and don't be too bothering and noisy. Some of these pictures will be used on a photographic book about the "Rule of S. Benedict" that the monks apply to their life.

Photographer's Testimonial

The image quality of 18-135 is very good, for an all-purposes lens. I use it with very slow shutter times and the O.I.S. is really effective helping to avoid blur also in difficult lights. Many of these pictures have been shot in very low light situations with ISO 3200/6400, and the quality of X-Trans sensor on X-T1 is great. The lens looks really durable and solid. I haven't tested the weather resistance in that situation, because during the shot was very hot days, but I tried later with a very funny test

Photographer's Work

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After the dinner the monks work together and this is the only "social" moment of all day, excluding the Mass. During these 30 minutes they can talk freely.
For the rest of the day, they tend to be silent. The X-T1 and 18-135 are the perfect companion: silent and discrete.

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After the Mass all the monks goes to their job. In the Abbey everyone has a specific task. The 18-135 allowed me to decide in a fraction of a second if I needed a wide or narrow field.

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The sunlight filtering through the windows of the Church and hits the monk. All the processions are held in silence, instead the Masses are sung. I used the wide angle here and decided to underexpose in a moment just spinning the thumb wheel left.

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The cellar of the Abbey is is located in an reconverted old cistern for collecting water. The monks produce red and white wine for themselves and to sell in the little craft shop. The white balance of the X-T1 is great, so that the natural light that comes from a door is perfect in color.

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Dom Mauro controls the quality of the wine produced. Here, too, the thumb wheel and the preview of the shot in the EVF allowed me to have the right exposure, so that the barrel is readable but the silhouette is dark as I desired.

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The old book's restoration shop works everyday with books of all ages, from 14th century.
These are some of the instruments they use everyday.
The 18-135 in the widest position allowed me to take pictures from very close.

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Dom Walter walks to the ancient library, that has been recognised as an Italian National Monument.
I love the contrast of light and darkness and the reflection of the floor. The 18-135 lens has handled very well the backlight.

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Dom Walter consult a manuscript in the ancient wooden library of 16th century. The X-Trans sensor managed very well the contrast between the bright lights and deep shadows.

 

Andrew Hall

Photographer's Bio

With over 25 years of experience as a professional photographer Andrew has enjoyed an award winning career in a wide range of photographic genres from the high speed world of Motorsport to Landscapes and Specialist portraiture. Based in Sydney Australia Andrew is fortunate enough to travel the world pursuing his passion for photography and is always keen to utilize the latest technologies to capture images in situations previously out of reach.

About this Project

I have photographed the 24hr sportscar race in Le Mans France for the last 14 years. It is a race of legend, this year being the 82nd running of the race. 56 teams in a twice around the clock battle facing the challenges of weather, fatigue and mechanical stress. For this years race I had an XT-1 body to use alongside my existing Xpro-1 and saw the XF18-135 as the perfect lens to capture a variety of images from wide angle pit lane scenes to telephoto on track action.

Photographer's Testimonial

The XF18-135 produces the superb image quality I have come to expect from using the existing XF series lens with the added advantage of a wide angle to telephoto in the one lens. The XF18-135 is light and compact and the O.I.S is superb and allows me to shoot in low light conditions and still capture razor sharp images at slow shutter speeds. Motorsport photography is at the mercy of the elements, blazing sun, wind, rain and dust. I experienced all of those at Le Mans this year and the weather resistant features of the lens meant I could shoot in all conditions with confidence knowing that the lens and my XT-1 body would continue to deliver the performance that I rely on.

Photographer's Work

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The driver waiting to go out to a qualifying Session, his mind visualizing a fast lap. In the low light of the garage the O.I.Son the XF18-135 meant that I could shootat lower shutter speeds with confidence and the zoom range enabled me to compose the shot to my liking whilst not moving around in the garage too much, getting in the way of mechanics doing their job!

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This corner on the Le Mans circuit is one of my favourites as you can get close to the cars at speed. It is a difficult corner to shoot as you cant see the cars coming from this vantage point and they appear in the viewfinder quickly. XF18-135 was attached to an XT-1 with continuous AF mode and performed brilliantly.
The zoom range meant that I could readjust the shot if thedriver took a different line through the corner ormade a mistake, ending up in the gravel trap!

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Refueling is always a tense time in the pits. There is always the risk that a fuel spill onto the red hot brakes or exhaust would cause a fire. I liked the fact that the back of this gorgeous white Ferrari was covered with oil smears and dirt from the track, a testament to the grueling nature of this race. The wide angle of the XF18-135 enabled me to get close in to the action of the pit stop capturing the mechanics at work.

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This team made history at Le Mans this yearwith driver Matt McMurry becoming the youngest driver to compete in the 24 Heures Du Mans at only 16 years of age! I was able to use the telephoto end of the XF18-135 to good effect isolating the car at the end of pit lane in the early morning light.

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Back at my favourite corner again ! This car appealed tome as you don't often see a lime green Ferrari ! Red ones yes, Yellow ones sometimes but not this colour!
The car may have been an odd colour but the sweet Ferrari noise was the same! The XF18-135 was superb in capturing the true colour and vibrance of this unique race Car and the XT-1 AF continuous mode didn't miss a beat.

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The mechanics, looking like red and black storm troopers from a star wars movie make last minute adjustments to the Rebellion R1 race car before sending it on its way. This car was one of the nicest to photograph with the striking colour scheme and beautiful design. Here again the wide angle of the XF18-135 ensured I was able to get in close to the action and still include all the elements I needed to convey the story.

 

Masaaki Aihara

Photographer's Bio

Born in Tokyo in 1958. Graduated from the Department of Journalism (Newspaper/Printed Media), Nihon University with a Bachelor's degree in Journalism. As a step towards reaching his aim of participating in the Paris-Dakar Rally, he made his first journey across the Australian Outback by a motorcycle, and instead discovered a passion for the Australian continent. Currently a free-lance photographer, Aihara is also active as a "Friend of Tasmania" (goodwill ambassador). Works by the renowned photographer have been exhibited in shows in Australia, Europe and around Asia.

About this Project

I selected XF18-135mm for mainly two reasons. One is to create works like photo documentary stories. X18-135mm covers practically all the shooting ranges normally expected, allowing us to eliminate time loss and pressure associated with change of lenses, so that we can maintain a natural and smooth flow of shooting processes. The best moment may come at an unexpected time, and it may last for only a few seconds. If you are changing the lens during that moment, it will be irreparable time loss.
The other reason for selecting XF18-135mm is its weather resistant structure. The main field of this project was Tasmania, known for its World Heritage primeval forest and located in a zone of rainstorms from Antarctica. The weather is very changeable here, described as "having four seasons in a day". This conversely means that we can observe dynamic and delicate changes of the nature. To do so, we may have to use our cameras under considerably harsh conditions. But I do wish to explore photo opportunities and capture the best moments even sacrificing my equipment.
Cameras and lenses should be "weapons", not mere hobby tools, for photographers who pursue light, shadow and time as "light snipers" to capture a light that would never be recoverable again. That is why I selected X-T1 and XF18-135mm, which are capable of enduring harsh conditions while providing superb color reproducibility being at the world' s highest level. Now I know that my choice was correct.

- Photography in cooperation with: QANTAS Airways; Tourism Tasmania

Photographer's Testimonial

Before using XF18-135mm, actually I had a very negative impression about versatile lenses, from my experience of using other manufacturer's model. Although its wide shooting range was convenient, I did not think it was qualifiable for creating photographic works. However, such a negative feeling vanished away immediately when I took the first shot with XF18-135mm in the waiting room of Sydney Airport. At the same time I was amazed at sophisticated technology of Fujinon engineers.
What impressed me the most in this project was that the shooting processes proceeded smoothly in a rhythmical manner. It means that I could take photos naturally as though breathing the air, as a result of being released from change of lenses that may interrupt the rhythm of shooting.
And above all, XF18-135mm and X-T1 enabled me to take photos in the forests of Tasmania under such a harsh condition that drips of rainwater fell over the camera. Protected by their perfect weather-proof performance, I was able to concentrate on the world inside the finder and the movement of light and clouds, being so deeply absorbed in creation of works that I sometimes forgot the existence of the camera and lens. The combination of XF18-135mm and X-T1 drove the photographer into positive rhythms to take photos one after another and to concentrate on creation of works at a high level. I actually felt that they would become one of the strongest couples for making portraits of the Earth.

Photographer's Work

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Vicinity of Wisemans Ferry, suburbs of Sydney, Australia
Mr. Blacker runs a ranch in the suburbs of Sydney. He starts a day with the sunrise by going out for a look-around in his vast farmland. Wearing an Aussie hat, he goes away on his 4WD motorbike down the dusty road into the forest. My lens continued focusing on the running bike's tail lamp accurately, thanks to its superb AF function and wide zoom range. Exactly being a "lock-on" target, the subject could not escape the shooting range of XF18-135mm, enabling me to capture a moment of Mr. Blacker's morning with a subtle balance between the bumpy road, sand dust and motorbike.

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Sydney, Australia
The "Harbor Bridge Climb" experience is one of the greatest sightseeing attraction in Sydney. I tried taking photos of the Bridge and climbing people from an even higher tower above them. By placing people at the right edge as an "accent" to the picture, I tried to capture the massive feeling and geometric structure of the Bridge's construction and girder. What I wanted to portray the most was the sense of texture of steel. Using the Provia mode with lower exposure amount, I could translate the massive feeling of the steel frames to the picture successfully.
The wide zoom range of my lens enables me to capture views of the world that I exactly intend to portray, especially when the shooting position is restricted, thereby relieving the photographer from dilemma of framing. I was so excited that I took as many as about 100 photos at this point.

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Sydney, Australia
The outside light falling upon the building gives very photogenic light and shade, and further makes the vivid pink and blue of the Japanese rain umbrella standing out in the monotone.
There was only one position where I could take photos at will, on a step halfway in a stairway inside the building. To make matters more challenging, the balance between the light, shade, and color was very delicate and was changing constantly, so I had to determine the framing and focus to press the shutter as quickly as possible. XF18-135mm captured an uncompromising framing and the most desired state of the light onto the sensor, in exactly the same way as I pictured in my mind --- it was a portrayal of my mental picture rather than a mere photographic image.

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Hobart, the State of Tasmania, Australia
I woke up to the morning light falling on my eyelid. Deep red sunlight was shining on the area around me. I crept out of the sleeping bag, jumped to my feet and grabbed X-T1 and XF18-135mm at my pillow. I had no time to set down the tripod or select a lens having the most suitable angle of view. This color and light might disappear soon, possibly in only a few seconds.
At the very moment when I looked through the finder, my lens let me determine the framing instantly. In addition, the 5-stop image stabilization (O.I.S.) function helped capture the best moment into a non-blurring and sharp picture, even for a photographer who had just woken up and was still tired from the previous day's flight.

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Mount Field National Park, the State of Tasmania, Australia
This National Park is known for its rainy climate. Also on this day the weather was bad with rain, sleet and snow, but I could take photos safely for 2 hours by just cleaning the camera and lens several times using a towel.
Another challenge was that, from the viewpoint of nature conservation, freedom of choosing the shooting position is limited here, because we are expected not to walk on the native-grown moss called the cushion plant, which is an important natural asset of Tasmania. Furthermore, only a slight difference in the angle or angle of view affects the quality of work significantly.
Even in such a condition, XF18-135mm enabled me to take many photos efficiently in a short time, allowing me to concentrate on creating pictures without worrying about rain. I had never been so thankful like this time for the convenience and joy of being able to concentrate on framing. I truly felt that XF18-135mm is the best choice especially under a difficult condition.

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Sydney, Australia CBD
When Mr. Blacker was about to finish the look-around, his loved Dalmatian dog came to me for morning greeting. At that time I was standing with the sun on my back, but instantly I turned to the opposite side and set the film simulation of X-T1 to the monochrome R mode, and found the position quickly and held the camera, and at the same time performed the framing and focusing. In a shortest possible time, I should move to the shooting position and perform shooting with an appropriate framing. In this sense, photography is similar to soccer and ice hockey.
P.S.
When I showed him this photo after shooting, he said to me, "Thank you. I will have to part with this farmland soon. This would be the last photo for my memories."

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Sydney, Australia CBD
One of my pleasures in street photography is to cut out the most beautiful part of buildings. This photo was produced after taking dozens of trial shots to determine the optimum balance, position and proportion to fit together the main column and the red column on the right as an accent. I particularly aimed at portraying the beauty of the vertical line by using XF18-135mm. A blonde woman was standing there wearing high heels, leaning on the lit column. She was a nice subject to illustrate the size of the building, but her position was too much leftward of the desired position. She seemed to be waiting for the traffic signal to change. As soon as the pedestrian signal changed from red to green, she walked forward for 3 steps — "Bingo!!"

 

Olivier Polet

Photographer's Bio

Professional photographer since 1990, I started as Press photographer. Has been collaborating over the past 20 years with several major photo agencies, such as Sipa in Paris (1995-2005), Action Press in Germany, Corbis,...I had the opportunity to set up my own company & to dedicate my shooting around the Belgian Royal Family. Official royal photographer for about 15 years, I made different books & exhibitions around this particular topic. As a photographer I currently working on a long-term project, following the diamond trail around the world, and putting the last touch on book projects with the Belgian royal family. I'm the author of several books, on subjects as diverse as the Greenhouses of Laeken, Social Housing in Brussels, King Albert and Queen Paola, Philippe and Mathilde's 10 years wedding Anniversary, and an homage to Brussels' social workers. Besides, I'm working together with a Belgian press agency : Reporters. This give me the opportunity to drive my business abroad.

About this Project

I have been to Congo with this beautifull brand new lens 18-135mm I had to shoot for one NGO (Action Damien) taking care of leprosy, some atmospher pictures in a village, I was very impatient to try this kind of lens. Scenes of life, school, village, peoples with handicap, need some distance to can shoot in harmony. This lens was helpfull.

Photographer's Testimonial

The first impression When I had the lens in my hand was, this lens is so light with an impression of solidity. I was impatient to put on my new X-T1. This couple was perfect, I did not want to take it out if the zoom is still a little bit hard to move, your hand easily take advantage to manipulate it easily. The AF is so quick. It was not the rain season, I could not use this lens with The tropical rain.

Photographer's Work

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This gentleman have leprosy, I was very impressed by his intense regard, with tis deep expression.This blue back ground with this red T-shirt was perfect to make a nice portrait.

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In Congo there is thousand of little of workshops. We are in a small factory making furnitures in wooden. Tere was little light. I wanted to catch this atmospher.

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African kids are so expressif. In school they begin the day with a clean white shirt and at the end of the day I am always impressed to see the kids leaving school with this shirts always so white !

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Blue back ground, kids at school, so attentive, nice light, and a perfect zoom to make this picture.

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Africa, so photogenic, each kid is a poem, regard so deep for this age.

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This village near Kinshasa is inhabited of leprous, they are living with all they familly and trying to be autonomous.

Kerry Hendry

Photographer's Bio

Kerry Hendry is an outdoor photographer who is passionate about landscape photography, alongside fine art equestrian commissions and adventures. Her equine images have been widely published in national media and sell worldwide. A keen rider from a very young age, Kerry combines her three main passions in life—horses, photography and travel.

"When I was asked to test an early prototype of the new XF18-135mm lens I was thrilled. I think the best test for any kit is to get out and use it, so the lens has been used on many equine and landscape shoots over the last few months. I don't have a testing lab, and I am sure the photo media worldwide will provide test data once the lens is officially released—so here's my "hands on' review of this little beauty!"

About this Project

I shoot a lot of horse photography—and I chose to test the lens on Polo and Horse Racing—two of the fastest equestrian sports. Whether it was early morning, high on a hill with the racehorses, or under the intense pressure on the polo field—these were the ideal locations to test the new lens in action.

Both sports are adrenaline fuelled and thrilling to watch—perfect to put the focusing and OIS through its paces. I also tested using a combination of CH (high speed burst) and single image shooting modes, together with single and continuous autofocus, to test all aspects of the lens (and camera!) performance on high speed subjects.

In addition, I put the lens to work shooting landscapes, even using 10-stop neutral density filters to slow things right down to a 15 second exposure. A lens like this needs to be suitable for a wide range of subjects—so it's been out and about a lot!

Photographer's Testimonial

For me, the focal range of the XF18-35mm is brilliant—it will certainly be a great lens for general everyday use and travel, it's so versatile. To test the lens I've deliberately shot a range of subjects—from high speed horses, to long exposure landscapes—testing all aspects of the lens' capability and handling.
I found the quality really good—even on this early production sample - images are sharp and the images produced, pleasing. Even with the super-useful range in focal length, the lens is still compact and lightweight—and handles really well on both the X-E2 and X-T1 bodies that I am currently using. Being the first "Weather Sealed" lens in the Fuji range it's also perfect for my outdoor, muddy playground! It rained so hard during one of the polo matches, the riders all charged off the pitch to take shelter!
The XF18-135mm would be an ideal companion to travel photography where it is perfect for the "one lens" approach—and I would certainly recommend it for this purpose. The OIS seemed to be very effective when shooting handheld—giving you a little extra room for manoeuvre on shutter speed and aperture. This has been really useful lately as even some of the outdoor shoots here in the UK have been in very low light and stormy conditions. Overall it's a super versatile lens, producing great quality images, and which handles brilliantly. For me, the ultimate test is whether I would spend my own money and buy one myself.
Would I? Yes, absolutely—it would be the perfect lens for me, completing the ideal Fuji travel set up, perhaps alongside the 14mm for wider landscapes.

Photographer's Work

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In this image I wanted to capture the speed at which the horses travel, while showing the amazing skills of the players—the precision they demonstrate while at full speed is incredible. Here, galloping along the boards, one player is making a break with the ball. Horse, rider and sight of the ball give you a sense of the thrill of watching this breathtaking sport.

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This image—and the story behind it—is one of my favourites. I set out with a vision of exactly what I wanted to capture. The racehorses only train for a very short time each morning—and I knew I only had a limited number of chances to capture this shot. In fact I had one chance. This was the last horse, over the very last jump. Although early morning, the sun was already quite high in a cloudless sky, and I wanted to capture the silhouette of the horse and rider. I was as close as they would allow me to get, crouched near the jump—and had one shot. I love the way the light kisses the shoulder and thigh of the jockey, and the boots of the horse just a split second before they land. This image is already printed, framed and on the wall of the horses owner!

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In contrast to the first image of the solo polo player—here's a classic example of the frantic throng of polo! Riders, hooves and sticks all clashing in the battle to get to the ball first. Only right handed players are allowed in polo, for safety reasons, but it's still a battle of the fastest and bravest—both in pony and player. A high shutter speed captures the action perfectly, a frantic moment frozen in time.

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This is about as close as I can get to the racing action—even working closely with the racehorse trainer. The horses here were just feet away—and crossing straight in front of me. A perfect test of the focusing abilities of the lens. Photographically with horses, it's all about the legs being in the right place and I love how the lead horse is captured with its leg perfectly straight, full stride and just a nose in front of the others. As the horses approached, it would have been easy to get distracted by the sound of thundering hooves approaching!

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After all the high adrenaline shoots with the horses, it was time to slow things down—literally. Shooting the pier was the perfect test of focusing and sharpness on a very detailed subject. Here the camera (Fuji X-T1) was on a tripod and using a LEE Big Stopper 10-stop neutral density an exposure of 15 seconds was made. The autofocus was accurate, there's no obvious sign of distortion, and the long exposure gives the wonderful serene calm feeling.

Ben Cherry

Photographer's Bio

Ben is a 22-year-old recently graduated Zoology student who combines his love of nature with photography. Focusing on capturing moments, Ben has travelled the world combining these two passions to experience new cultures and visit some of nature's wonders from the Great Barrier Reef, the Victoria Falls, Simian Mountains of Ethiopia, and the rainforests of Borneo. He has won photographic competitions with National Geographic and the Rotary Foundation as well as being highly commended in Travel Photographer of the Year and been a finalist in the BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/BenCherryPhotography

Twitter- @Benji_Cherry

About this Project

The Farne Islands are a set of islands off the Northumberland coast of England, and are home to thousands of seabirds. I chose to take the XF18-135mm to the Farne Islands because this versatile lens was deal for the crammed, fast paced action that occurs during the breeding season. The ability to cover such a range with a single lens meant that I spent less time worrying about which lens I needed on the camera and more about the shots I wanted to capture.

Photographer's Testimonial

The XF18-135mm was the only lens I really needed while visiting the islands, its versatility covered everything I required to photograph my experience. Despite the large range the image quality holds up very well, which is one of the reasons why I like the Fujifilm X-Series system so much—the lenses are top notch. Compared to other photographers on the island, I could move around freely as I was carrying about 4-5kg less than them with their super telephoto lenses. Combine all these factors with the exceptional O.I.S and weather sealing meant I didn't have to worry about the occasionally overcast conditions and sharp rain showers.

Photographer's Work

Kittiwakes were busy bringing material back to their cliff top nests. I wanted to test the tracking abilities of the lens in difficult conditions. 4:30am offered amazing low, golden light which is a hard backdrop to track a subject against, but the lens coped very well and I'm happy with the result. This also tested how lens stands up to flare and the results were also impressive, especially for a zoom.

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These birds live in large colonies on cliffs, which act as a form of protection—safety in numbers. With the sun behind me the light was hitting this cliff at a low angle, casting vibrant colours that the Fujifilm system is so good at capturing. The wide end of the zoom gave a very different perspective encompassing the cloud scape, together with the bird-filled sky.

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The Farne Islands are covered with thousands of seabirds. It is a challenge to capture the full scale of this spectacle, as demonstrated by this head-on shot of the cliffs of Inner Farne. Being on a boat there are limitations to how much you can move; here the versatility of the zoom came into its own enabling me to indulge in close-ups of these beautiful birds as well as wide-angle shots.

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Arctic terns are ground nesting birds and will protect their nests aggressively. Thankfully all nests are clearly marked out to prevent any accidental damage but this doesn't prevent their instinctiveness to mob. The 28mm equivalent focal length was ideal for photographing this, combined with the very fast tracking focus meant that even if I wasn't looking through the viewfinder (to avoid being pecked) I could photograph this behaviour.

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The skies of the Farne islands are alive with activity and the trick is to pick a bird to follow as they come into land. Guillemots, as seabirds, only come on land to breed, so landing on a hard surface isn't their best attribute, making for some amusing moments.

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When photographing puffins you need to get low down, as they are so small. This gives a much better perspective. I like this shot because I used a nearby mound to create the out of focus foreground, keeping the focus on this amusing puffin as it came out of its burrow.

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We were lucky enough to see a pod of dolphins on our return boat journey. The great thing about this lens is its flexibility, especially when you are limited by the movement of the boat and dolphins. This allowed me to frame Bamburgh Castle behind this pod of bottlenose dolphins.

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Arctic terns are beautiful birds and luckily this individual allowed me to get very close. The minimum focusing distance of this lens is fantastic, making it a truly all purpose lens. I love the pleasingly smooth out of focus background in contrast to the clear detail of the tern's plumage.

David Cleland

Photographer's Bio

David Cleland is a landscape and reportage photographer based in Belfast, Northern Ireland.
He is best known for his landscape and documentary photography which has featured in a number of photographic exhibitions including an exploration of the decay of a 400-year evacuated mill which received critical acclaim. David also teaches film and animation applying the rules of still photography to the art of moving image.

David's work has been accepted by Getty Images and been published in a number of national publications and used in numerous book covers.

David is the author of two eBooks on the art of photography including, the now famous ‘The Long Exposure eBook’ and has written a number of articles on the importance of photography in education.

About this Project

For this project I wanted to capture the beautiful city of Belfast in a range of weather conditions. Belfast is a stunning city for culture, architecture and history. There was so much of Belfast I love photographing but for this particular project I visited a few of my favourite areas. The journey included the Titanic studios where "Game of Thrones" is made, Harland and Wolff, home of the Titanic as it works on the Blackford Dolphin, the famous Queen's University and finally the cathedral quarter in the rain. Such a project requires the versatility of the long range offered by the 18-135mm lens which performed perfectly.

Photographer's Testimonial

Photography for me is about getting away from it all and exploring the great outdoors. I have always appreciated the reliability and portability of the Fujifilm system and predictably, the 18-135mm offers a dependable level of versatility. Offering a fantastic focal range the weather sealed lens offers state of the art 5-stop stabilization making it the perfect combination for the great, Northern Ireland outdoors. It was liberating to take the X-T1 and the 18-135mm around Belfast in the rain without a thought. Combining this cutting edge lens technology with the renowned Fujifilm image quality makes the 18-135mm lens a pleasure to use.

Photographer's Work

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I love this area of Belfast, the birth place of the Titanic is currently home to the famous Blackford Dolphin oil rig. It is a remarkable sight, especially at night and the size and scale is simply breath taking. Getting low to the surface of the puddle I focused on creating a horizontal mirror image of this famous Belfast scene using a long exposure time.

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Northern Ireland is becoming a leader in filmmaking thanks to the work of Northern Ireland Screen. Titanic Studios is currently home of "The Game of Thrones" but films such as "City of Ember" were also made the the former giant paint hall.

Again, with the studio reflecting in the summer puddles I employed a slow shutter speed to ensure the reflection was as sharp as possible.

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Belfast is a culture rich city, the Cathedral Quarter is hive of activity night and day,; Cafés, restaurant and bars make the historic Cathedral Quarter of Belfast particularly special. I was struck by the light leaking into the dark alley way and was able to frame the entrance to the upper centre of the frame, I just love the want the light illuminates the cobbled pathway. For me, it just felt like a classic black and white image.

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I've been playing with using reflections in my photography, as demonstrated in the first two images. This photograph of Great Victoria Street brings together the urban landscape with the timeless walker. The character is very much the focus of the shot but there is still plenty to look at on the street and in the reflection.

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Elmwood Avenue is a tree lined avenue in the heart of the University area of Belfast. I was captivated by the summer sun shining through the Student's Union building on to the street and the fact the scene communicated the warmth of the evening with the leading lines highlighting the walkers. The 18-135mm is a great lens for this type of documentary photography. The detail is throughout, from foreground to the distance there is something to take in.

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The Lanyon Building at Queen's University was built in 1845. What I love most about the entrance of this building are the two Angels who "guard the entrance portal heralding wisdom and virtue within." I wanted to capture the angel from the same angle as those who look up at them as they pass through to the University's Quad. The zoom meant I was able to capture the detail of the angel from ground level.

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This image was captured a few miles from Belfast in the city of Lisburn. The image is one of my favourite views from Lisburn's R-Space gallery. I love the fact there is detail from the old twisted roof in the foreground through to the clock tower in the distance. The long focal range of the 18-135mm lens meant I was able to frame the image exactly the way I wanted. I particularly like the way the clouds bring a sense of drama to the image.

[Photo] Sample Image

Queen's University of Belfast is a sight to behold. I used to walk through the quad three or four times a day marveling the beauty of the Lanyon Building. This photograph is another long exposure image, it was a cloudy evening so to draw a focus to the building I wanted to smooth out the clouds. Additionally the sun was low in the sky and reflects nicely off the brick work and windows.